Categories
Privacy Security

Houseparty – porn-bombing, and hacking

With people around the world self-isolating during the Coronavirus pandemic, social video apps like Houseparty are gaining popularity, and notoriety.

In late March 2020, users started suggesting on twitter that there was a Houseparty hack, in which hackers were stealing peoples Netflix and Spotify logins.

The company that developed Houseparty, Epic Games, told the Sun “We’ve found no evidence to suggest a link between Houseparty and the compromises of other unrelated accounts,”.

After investigating the claims Houseparty posted a tweet on their official Twitter account “Our investigation found that many of the original tweets spreading this claim have been deleted and we’ve noticed Twitter accounts suspended.”

“It’s a disheartening situation for a service like ours that’s bringing people much needed face-to-face social connections and empathy at a critical time.”

It seems that Houseparty has been a victim of a smear-campaign in this instance. However this does not mean that Houseparty is not without it flaws.

Houseparty uses unlocked rooms in which anybody can pop in to say hello. This has lead to the practise of “porn-bombing” were a troll will join a random room specifically to display pornographic content, or to expose themselves.

Houseparty rooms by default are unlocked, meaning anybody can join. Users can make their rooms private, but this means people cant just hop into a room, which does remove the ‘house party’ vibe of the app.